Calm Wind Foils Moth Worlds Fleet

UK Racers Show Their Sterns To Fleet Before All Racing Abandoned

Kaneohe Bay, HI (14 October 2013) – An 8-knot easterly breeze swept through Kaneohe Bay just after noon today, providing a glimmer of hope for day one of the 2013 McDougall + McConaghy Moth World Championship fleet despite a dire forecast. With conditions forecast to build slightly throughout the day, Race Officer Tom Pochoreva and his Kaneohe Yacht Club-based team jumped on the chance for a solid race between two squalls shortly after 1230 PM. “The fleet was foiling around and sailing fast for a while, but when the wind started to die we realized we couldn’t get a fair race in and we pulled the plug,” said Pochoreva. “Things are looking better and better for the rest of the week, and we’re looking forward to some great action tomorrow.”

Proving the conventional wisdom accurate, the British contingent showed strong speed in the light air, with Robert Greenhalgh and Tom Offer trading the lead around the course despite leaving the start line nearly 3 minutes late. “I was a bit confused about the course signals and ended up very late for the start,” said Greenhalgh, who at one point was nearly a half leg ahead of the next competitor even after giving the fleet a head start. “The boat is going really well, and I was able to get on the foils and stay there after much of the fleet dropped down into low-riding mode.”

Tuesday’s weather outlook has improved significantly, with most models showing more wind than previously forecast. “We’re looking at around 8-10 knots tomorrow, with up to 12 knots on Thursday,” said an optimistic Pochereva.

For a breakdown of the likely Top Ten for this year’s Worlds fleet, check two-time World Champ Simon Payne’s insightful breakdown of the Moth Worlds fleet. You can find names, sail numbers, and origin for each competitor here.

Racing begins at 1200 tomorrow, with up-to-the-minute coverage on the Moth Worlds Facebook Page. You can find photo galleries of Nationals, Practice, World Championship racing in the Moth World Galleries.

Photos are rights-free for editorial use only to a maximum half page size.. Mandatory credit to read ©ThMartinez/Sea&Co/Moth World Championship.

13_24932 2013 McDOUGALL+McCONAGHY Moth Worlds Day 113_25085 2013 McDOUGALL+McCONAGHY Moth Worlds Day 113_25087 2013 McDOUGALL+McCONAGHY Moth Worlds Day 113_25070 2013 McDOUGALL+McCONAGHY Moth Worlds Day 1
Clean Racing Tip Of The Day

As one of the world’s most elite racing classes, the International Moth Class believes it essential to emphasize the responsible use of energy and resources in the context of sailing. Working with 11th Hour Racing, a program of the Schmidt Family Foundation, the Moth Class has come up with a number of initiatives to help all sailing events improve the energy profile and performance of racing boats and increase the personal investment of sailors in the health of our waters.

Each day, the Moth Worlds fleet will highlight a ‘Clean Racing Tip’ they’ve implemented; something that will work for regattas and racing classes around the world. Here’s today’s tip:

SMART SHIPPING: Encourage competitors to ship their boats together, using surface freight whenever possible. This will cut down significantly on carbon emissions and the regatta’s carbon footprint. Likewise, try to make local charter boats available for competitors from far away. For local sailors, lending or sharing your boat with a ‘rock star’ from another part of the country or world is a great way to get your boat tuned up and up to speed.
# # #

For photos, interview requests, or additional information about the Moth Worlds, please contact us at usmothclass@gmail.com.

Britain’s Greenhalgh Wins Practice Race As Fleet Prepares For Light-Air Conditions

Rare Forecast Brings Uncertainty To World Championship Fleet

Kaneohe Bay, HI (13 October 2013) – A rare October appearance of unstable weather conditions has sent shockwaves through the fleet on the eve of the 2013 McDougall + Maconaghy Moth World Championship, where 80 of the world’s fastest dinghy sailors from 15 nations are making final preparations for the prestigious event. Renowned sailing meteorologist Chris Bedford believes they may have some spare time ahead. “An upper low continues to move away from the Hawaiian Islands, but the associated upper trough and high cloud remains over the islands,” Bedford said. The trough will keep the subtropical ridge to the North weak, and he expects the usually reliable trade winds to remain sluggish “at least through midweek, and possibly through the end of the week.”

Dozens of sailors spent Sunday cutting, shaping, sanding, polishing, and otherwise modifying their boats’ foils — the underwater fins that allow the 11-foot Moth to fly above the waves and reach speeds unheard of just a few years ago — to optimize them for the expected light winds.

Britain’s Rob Greenhalgh drew first blood on the course, taking the easy victory in Sunday’s single practice race. Greenhalgh was unaffected by superstition as he blazed to victory on a squally, shifty Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Being a superstitious lot, most sailors will avoid winning the practice race before a major event, but Greenhalgh believes the opposite. “I took the practice race at the last Worlds [in the International 14 Class] I won, so I’m fine with this one,” said the dinghy, skiff, and Volvo Ocean Race veteran.

Greenhalgh and a small number of British sailors have shown strong light-air performance, adding to the spirited international rivalries on display here in Hawaii. “There are strong groups from Australia, New Zealand, The UK, the US, and Italy,” said California’s Zach Maxam. “It’s all in good fun, but there’s some real national pride here and it definitely adds excitement to the racing.”

Detroit’s Bora Gulari was crowned US National Champion here over the weekend with a strong win in the 75-boat fleet during last weekend’s regatta, but he says conditions will require ‘a little bit of everything’ to take the 2013 World Title. “It looks like we’ll have some light wind, some medium wind, and possibly a little strong breeze,” said Gulari, the last man to win a World Championship on US soil, in the Columbia River Gorge in 2009. “The very light guys may have a small advantage at times, but whoever can adapt the best to the widely varied conditions here will probably take home the World Championship trophy,” Gulari said.

Simon Payne says it may take even more. “Extreme could be the new normal here in Hawaii,” said the 2010 and 2006 Moth World Champion. “If the forecast proves true, the boys that can get to the ends of the start line to avoid the hole in the middle may find themselves looking very strong at the top mark, and those that can come up with the best foils for the conditions may see some advantage as well.” Payne has stepped away from competition this year to focus on his family, though he continues to contribute to the Moth fleet as coach and scribe. Read his humorous and insightful breakdown of the Moth Worlds fleet here.
You can find names, sail numbers, and origin for each competitor here.

Racing begins at 1200 tomorrow, with up-to-the-minute coverage on the Moth Worlds Facebook Page. You can find photo galleries of Nationals and pre-world racing in the Moth World Galleries here.

Photos Are Rights-Free For Editorial Use Only. Mandatory credit to read “Thierry Martinez/Sea&Co/International Moth Class”

Clean Racing Tip Of The Day

As one of the world’s most elite racing classes, the International Moth Class believes it essential to emphasize the responsible use of energy and resources in the context of sailing. Working with 11th Hour Racing, a program of the Schmidt Family Foundation, the Moth Class has come up with a number of initiatives to help all sailing events improve the energy profile and performance of racing boats and increase the personal investment of sailors in the health of our waters.

Each day, the Moth Worlds fleet will highlight a ‘Clean Racing Tip’ they’ve implemented; something that will work for regattas and racing classes around the world. Here’s today’s tip:

LEAD BY EXAMPLE! Make sure the best sailors in the fleet — the people who everyone else looks to for tuning and strategy advice — are on board with the green program. This shows the fleet that the green message is for real, and that the values of environmental conservation are truly the values of the sport.

# # #

For photos, interview requests, or additional information about the Moth Worlds, please contact us at usmothclass@gmail.com.

Sailing Instructions Amendments 1 & 2

Moth Worlds Sailing Instructions Amendment 1 & 2

Please read the full amendments.

  • The start time for the practice race on Sunday 13th October is 1pm.
  • The time limit for finishing after the first boat is now 20 minutes.

2013 US Moth Nationals – Final Results

2013 US Moth Nationals Final Results

2013 US Nationals – Day 1 Results

Moth Nationals 2013 Results Day 1

Bora Gulari leads the 75 boat US Nationals fleet with the UK’s Chris Rashley in 2nd.

Rule 42 Notice

Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) prohibits rocking and ooching in all its forms. The Class has witnessed a number of offences across recent World Championships whereby competitors have sailed against the rules that govern our racing, particularly in the form of ‘wing bouncing’ and ‘ooching’.

The ISAF Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) state:

RRS 42.1

“Her crew may adjust the trim of sails and hull, and perform other acts of seamanship, but shall not otherwise move their bodies to propel the boat.”

RRS 42.2

“pumping: repeated fanning of any sail either by pulling in and releasing the sail or by vertical or athwartship body movement….”

The moth class rules make the following exception:

  1. 2.1  RRS 42.3(c) is amended to read:
  2. 2.2  When surfing (rapidly accelerating down a wave), foiling (sailing with the hullclear of the water due to the effect of hydrofoils) or planning is possible, the boat’s crew may pump the sail in order to initiate surfing, foiling or planning, but only twice for each wave or gust of wind or just after having completed a tack or a gybe.

Therefore, competitors are reminded that ooching, ‘wing bouncing’ and all other acts to promote foiling, except from the 2 sail pumps after each tack/gybe or 2 pumps to promote foiling (i.e. off a start line), are prohibited.

The jury has been instructed to protest any boat found in breech of these rules, and given on-water umpiring is not invoked at this event; a protest against these illegal actions will result in a formal hearing post race where the outcome is a DSQ rather than a lessor penalty.

2013 Worlds RRS42

Measurement Instructions

Formal check measurement will not be conducted prior to the championship (e.g. everyone lines up to get measured over 1 to 2 days).

Random checks will be conducted throughout the event and if found in breech of class rules, a report is required to be lodged with the Jury, who is then mandated by the Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) to commence a protest hearing – these will result in DSQ from one or more races.

Measurers and Jury will be looking for the following:

  • Hull with valid ISAF plaque on stern or forward bulkhead
  • Sail signed in the tack area by an official class measurer showing total area anddate measured.
  • Sail number corresponds to hull ISAF plaque number, unless you placed top 10 in the 2012 Worlds in which case you may carry your place as your number; and correct country code on sail.
  • Sail numbers 300mm high and 60mm apart for all sails measured after 22 March 2013 (for all sails measured prior to this 250mm high numbers as per the class rules at that time).
  • 15mm wide band, 5185mm from the mast top, in contrasting colour to the mast(black mast, white band), and sail luff not extending past this mark at all times whilst sailing.
  • Random max beam measurements in the boat-park (2250mm) – tighten your back wing strop!

Footnote: Some competitors have asked if the IMCA Executive Committee can waive sail number size rules. It cannot, as the class rules can only be amended with the approval of ISAF (class rule 1.3 & 1.4), which takes at least a month to process. It takes only one protest (from competitor, Jury or measurer) against a boat with illegal sail numbers, or other rule transgressions, for it to be subject to DSQ from all races.

We have 4 pages of class rules compared to 37 pages for 470’s and 15 for 49er’s, please familiarise yourself with them at http://www.moth-sailing.org/download/MTH2013CR220313.pdf

2013 Worlds Measurement Instructions.

Velocitek Dash For Cash – Official Rules

The official rules for the Velocitek Dash For Cash have been posted on Regatta Network.

US Nationals – Sailing Instructions

Download the US Nationals Sailing Instructions now from Regatta Network.

Moth Worlds – entries are in

The entries for the 2013 McDougall/McConaghy Moth Worlds are in.

Capped at 80 entries with 15 countries represented.

The Australians have turned up in force with 26 competitors, followed by hosts the USA with 17. Great Britain has 7, Switzerland 6, Sweden, Japan and Italy with 4, Ireland with 3, Austria and New Zealand with 2 and US Virgin Islands, Germany, Spain, France and The Netherlands with 1 each.

With a week to go before racing starts, more competitors are arriving at the Kaneohe Yacht Club by the hour.

Top